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20121001
20121031
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california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democrats wanted to see. if joe biden had one job at this event, it was to pump up the base. he did that job this week after obama's disappointing debate. and we saw obama here this week. this was a very busy week in politics. and it is all about enthusiasm in the base in places like san francisco, northern california. if voters here on the democratic side are not enthusiastic about getting out there for obama, if he doesn't have -- if they don't have his back, he's got trouble in congressional races and fund-raising and everything else.
scenario. it's -- it's def-con 5. >> from cities to suburbs, the decline in state funding and the slump in property values has hit hard. since 2007, the purse student spending in california has been cut by more than $1,200, while costs and salaries continue to rise. in schools around the state, like paraside intermediate in san bruno, the budget cuts have affected the classroom. >> anything you know about atomic structure. >> this eighth grade science teacher says increased class size and lack of funds to upgrade her cramped, 1950s era classroom, are effecting her ability to teach. >> i cram 32 students into this small classroom. so, when, i mean, can you imagine doing a lab in here? i have four chairs to one table. with such large class sizes, i am not able to spend as much time with each student. >> california's schools haven't always relied on the state for the bulk of their funding. until the 1970s, districts raised most of their money through property taxes and bonds. rich districts flourished. poor and minority districts struggled. such inequality was ruled illegal by the state su
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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